Oj simson

Oj Simson Inhaltsverzeichnis

Orenthal James Simpson ist ein ehemaliger US-amerikanischer American-Football-Spieler und Schauspieler. Weltweite Aufmerksamkeit erlangte Simpson auch durch den Verdacht, seine Exfrau Nicole Brown Simpson und deren Bekannten Ronald Goldman. Orenthal James Simpson (* 9. Juli in San Francisco, Kalifornien) ist ein ehemaliger US-amerikanischer American-Football-Spieler und Schauspieler. Der Strafprozess gegen O. J. Simpson (offiziell: The People of the State of California vs. Orenthal James Simpson) war ein Gerichtsverfahren im Jahr ,​. Fast auf den Tag genau 25 Jahre, nachdem seine Ex-Frau Nicole Brown Simpson und deren Freund Ron Goldman brutal ermordet wurden. O.J. Simpson spricht 25 Jahre nachdem seine Ex-Frau Nicole Brown Simpson und deren Freund Ron Goldman ermordet wurden über sein.

oj simson

Orenthal James Simpson (* 9. Juli in San Francisco, Kalifornien) ist ein ehemaliger US-amerikanischer American-Football-Spieler und Schauspieler. Der Strafprozess gegen O. J. Simpson (offiziell: The People of the State of California vs. Orenthal James Simpson) war ein Gerichtsverfahren im Jahr ,​. O. J. Simpson hat angekündigt, per Twitter ein paar Dinge klarzustellen – und umgehend drohen ihm neue juristische Probleme.

Simpson is innocent from the first trial," he said at the time. I said I think he's guilty and I said it many, many times.

They cannot prove it. The controversial investigator, who found the infamous bloody glove, served as a Los Angeles Police Department detective for 20 years before a felony conviction for perjury related to the trial.

When he was accused of planting one of the gloves as a racist effort to frame Simpson for the killings, he testified that he had not used the n-word in 10 years.

Multiple witnesses and an audio recording refuted his testimony, which resulted in the perjury conviction. Fuhrman has gone on to have a successful career as a New York Times best-selling author and TV analyst.

He is a forensic and crime scene expert for Fox News and hosts a radio show in Spokane, Wash. Simpson and called for his conviction. In , Denise started the Nicole Brown Charitable Foundation, and has worked since then as a public speaker and advocate to raise awareness about domestic violence issues.

Tanya Brown was Nicole Brown Simpson's youngest sister. She was just 7 years old when her sister began dating O. He was laid back, kind, sweet.

Her mission now is helping people who were victims of domestic violence, as well as their abusers. She has also written a book about her experience in the aftermath of her sister's murder, called "Finding Peace Amid the Chaos: My Escape from Depression and Suicide.

Kim Goldman, Ron Goldman's sister, never missed a single day of testimony at O. Simpson's criminal trial.

She and her father also traveled to Las Vegas, where Simpson had been arrested in after attempting to steal sports memorabilia he claimed belonged to him.

She's since channeled her grief into helping others. She is the executive director of SCV Youth Project, an organization that offers free counseling to teenagers, and she's written a new book, "Media Circus," about families dealing with high profile tragedies and public grief.

My brother's always right here for me. My son looks like my brother, to me. He has mannerisms that are similar," Kim Goldman said. I live my life with purpose because of him.

He's always very much a part of me. The father of murder victim Ron Goldman was an outspoken advocate for justice for his son during the trial.

There isn't a day that goes by that I don't think about my son," said Fred Goldman. High-profile defense attorney Alan Dershowitz served as the appellate advisor for Simpson's defense team.

The prolific Harvard University professor has since been involved in several well-known cases. Dershowitz defended hedge fund mogul Jeffrey Epstein in when he was accused of sexually abusing underage girls.

With Dershowitz's vigorous defense skills, Epstein wound up only sentenced to a year of house arrest. The attorney also advised Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's defense team and has become a major voice as an Israel advocate and a defender of civil and individual rights.

He has authored many books and op-ed articles. Defense lawyer Robert Shapiro has made a career of defending celebrities and famous athletes, including O.

He was named the lead counsel of Simpson's team soon after the double-murders, but was later pushed aside so Cochran could become lead counsel.

Shapiro, known for having frequent press conferences throughout Simpson's trial, went onto write bestselling legal books, offer legal analysis for news shows, and he founded the website LegalZoom.

He also started a foundation in memory of his son, Brent Shapiro, who died from drug problems. The Brent Shapiro Foundation worked to raise awareness of drug dangers and to open a rehab facility, the Pickford Lofts, which has helped celebrities including Lindsay Lohan.

Simpson's name. Scheck, a law professor at the Benjamin N. Scheck argued in the Simpson case that the LAPD had planted or contaminated the evidence they presented during the trial.

He made part of the closing statements to the jury. Scheck co-founded and is co-director of the Innocence Project and continues to teach at the Benjamin N.

Cardozo School of Law. Bailey made his mark on the case by cross-examining investigator Mark Fuhrman, whose testimony fell apart upon questioning.

After the trial, he was disbarred over misconduct in an unrelated trial. Bailey launched a website as part of a collaborative book project called "The Truth About the O.

Simpson Verdicts," meant to be a chronological account of how the lawyers handled the case. Simpson trial to be televised.

Ito retired on Jan. Shows Good Morning America. Kaelin testified Simpson was "upset" after the recital.

Both victims had been dead for about two hours prior to the arrival of police. Nicole's akita dog with bloodstained paws led neighbors to the body.

Schwab said he took the dog to a neighbor friend of his, who took the dog for a walk at approximately midnight and testified that it tugged on its leash and led him to Brown's house.

There he discovered Brown's dead body and flagged down a passing patrol car. Brown was found face down and barefoot at the bottom of the stairs leading to her front door, which was left open, with no signs of forced entry nor any evidence that anyone had entered the premises.

The final cut was deep into her neck, severing her carotid artery. Brown did have a large bruise on the center of her upper back so investigators concluded that, after the assailant had killed Goldman, he returned to Brown's body, put his foot on her back causing the bruise , pulled her head back by the hair and slit her throat.

On her banister was a melting cup of ice cream. Goldman lay nearby, close to a tree and the fence. He had been stabbed multiple times in the body and neck but like Brown had relatively few defensive wounds, which also signified a short struggle to investigators.

Near Goldman were his beeper and car keys, as well as the assailant's blue knit cap and left-hand glove — an extra-large, Aris Isotoner light leather glove.

Robert Riske, the first officer on the scene, testified to seeing a single bloody glove, among other evidence, at the crime scene.

Bloody shoe prints leaving the scene through the back gate were left by the assailant. To the left of some footprints were drops of blood from the assailant, who was apparently bleeding from their left hand, and coins were on the ground, apparently from the assailant's reaching into a pocket.

Measuring the distance between the steps showed the assailant walked away rather than ran.

Simpson was scheduled for a red-eye flight at p. Deciding that the Rockingham entrance was too tight, he returned to the Ashford gate and began to buzz the intercom at , getting no response.

He noted the house was dark and nobody appeared to be home as he smoked a cigarette and made several calls to his boss to get Simpson's home phone number.

He then testified he saw a "shadowy figure resembling Simpson" emerge from the area where the Bronco was later found to be parked and approached the front entrance before aborting and heading towards the southern walkway.

The same person then appeared shortly afterwards from the southern walkway and entered the house through the front door and the lights then came on.

At the same time Park witnessed this "shadowy figure" head towards the south walkway where the bloody glove would later be found, Kato Kaelin had just previously been on the telephone with his friend, Rachel Ferrara.

At approximately , something crashed into his wall, which he described as three "thumps" and which he feared was an earthquake.

Kaelin hung up the phone and ventured outside to investigate the noises, but decided not to venture directly down the dark south pathway from which the thumps had originated.

Instead, he walked to the front of the property, where he saw Park's limo outside the Ashford gate. Kaelin let Park in the Ashford gate, and Simpson finally came out the front door a few minutes later claiming he had overslept.

Park noted that on the way to the airport Simpson complained about how hot it was and was sweating and rolled down the window, despite it not being a warm night.

Simpson was running late but caught his flight. A passenger on the plane and the pilot testified to not noticing any cuts or wounds on Simpson's hands.

Peter Phillips, the former manager of the hotel, recalled Simpson asking for a Band-Aid for his finger at the front desk. Soon after discovering the female victim was Nicole Simpson, LAPD commander Keith Bushey ordered detectives Lange, Vannatter, Philips and Fuhrman to notify Simpson of her death and to give him a ride to pick up his children, who had been in Nicole's condo at the time of the murders and were at the police station.

They buzzed the intercom at the property for over 30 minutes but received no response. They noted the Bronco was parked on Rockingham at an awkward angle, with its back end out more than the front, and had blood on the door, which they feared meant someone inside might be hurt.

Detective Vannatter then instructed Fuhrman to scale the wall and unlock the gate to allow the other three detectives to enter.

The detectives would argue they entered without a search warrant because of exigent circumstances — specifically out of fear that someone inside might be injured.

Fuhrman briefly interviewed Kato Kaelin, who told him that the Bronco belonged to Simpson and that earlier that night he had heard thumps on his wall.

In a walk around the premises to inspect what may have caused the thumps, Fuhrman discovered a bloody glove; it was later determined to be the matching right hand glove of the one found at the murder scene.

This evidence was determined to be probable cause to issue an arrest warrant for Simpson. Detective Ron Phillips testified that when he called Simpson in Chicago to tell him of his ex-wife's murder, he sounded "very upset" but was oddly unconcerned about the circumstances of her death.

Philips noted that Simpson only asked if the children had seen the murder or Brown's body but was not concerned with the assailant harming his children either.

Detective Lange noticed that Simpson had a cut on a finger on his left hand that was consistent with where the killer was bleeding from and asked Simpson how he got it.

At first, he claimed he cut his finger accidentally while in Chicago after learning of Nicole's death. Lange then informed Simpson that blood was found inside his Bronco at which point Simpson admitted that he did cut his finger the same day as the murders but did not remember how.

He voluntarily gave some of his own blood for comparison with evidence collected at the crime scene and was released.

Simpson hired Robert Shapiro on Tuesday, June 14 and he began assembling the Dream Team but noted that an increasingly distraught Simpson had begun treatment for depression.

On Wednesday, June 15, preliminary results from DNA testing came back with matches to Simpson but the District Attorneys office delayed filing charges until all the results had come back.

On Thursday June 16, Simpson spent Thursday night at the San Fernando Valley home of friend Robert Kardashian ; Shapiro asked several doctors to attend to him because of Simpson's fragile mental state.

On Friday, June 17 detectives recommended that Simpson be charged with two counts of first-degree murder with special circumstance of multiple killings after the final DNA results came back.

Simpson told Shapiro he wanted to turn himself in [70] and the police agreed because they believed that someone as famous as Simpson would not attempt to flee.

The police even agreed to delay his surrender until 12pm so Simpson could be seen by a mental health specialist after showing signs of suicidal depression; he updated his will, called his mother and children, and wrote three sealed letters: one to his children, another to his mother, and one to the public.

More than 1, reporters waited for Simpson's perp walk at the police station, but he did not arrive as stipulated. Kardashian and Shapiro told Simpson this but when the police arrived an hour later, Simpson was gone along with Al Cowlings.

The three sealed letters he had written were left behind. He wrote to then girlfriend Paula Barbieri "I'm sorry As I leave, you'll be in my thoughts.

The letter concluded, "Don't feel sorry for me. I have had a great life, great friends. Please think of the real O.

At Kardashian's press conference, Shapiro said that he and Simpson's psychiatrists agreed with the suicide note interpretation.

Through television, Shapiro appealed to Simpson to surrender. The police tracked calls placed from Simpson on his cell phone.

When she caught up to it, Cowlings yelled out that Simpson was in the back seat of the vehicle and had a gun to his own head. More than nine news helicopters eventually joined the pursuit; Tur compared the fleet to Apocalypse Now , and the high degree of media participation caused camera signals to appear on incorrect television channels.

McKay agreed and asked Simpson to pull over and turn himself in instead of committing suicide; [80] "My God, we love you, Juice.

Just pull over and I'll come out and stand by you all the rest of my life", he promised. At Parker Center, officials discussed how to persuade Simpson to surrender peacefully.

Detective Tom Lange, who had interviewed Simpson about the murders on June 13, realized that he had Simpson's cell phone number and called him repeatedly.

A colleague hooked a tape recorder up to Lange's phone and captured a conversation between Lange and Simpson in which Lange repeatedly pleaded with Simpson to "throw the gun out [of] the window" for the sake of his mother and children.

Simpson apologized for not turning himself in earlier that day and responded that he was "the only one who deserved to get hurt" and was "just gonna go with Nicole".

He asked Lange to "just let me get to the house" and said "I need [the gun] for me". Cowlings's voice is overheard in the recording after the Bronco had arrived at Simpson's home surrounded by police pleading with Simpson to surrender and end the chase peacefully.

Los Angeles streets emptied and drink orders stopped at bars as people watched on television. Thousands of spectators and onlookers packed overpasses along the route of the chase, waiting for the white Bronco.

In a festival-like atmosphere, many had signs like "Go O. Simpson would commit suicide, escape, be arrested, or engage in some kind of violent confrontation.

Whatever might ensue, the shared adventure gave millions of viewers a vested interest, a sense of participation, a feeling of being on the inside of a national drama in the making.

Simpson reportedly demanded that he be allowed to speak to his mother before he would surrender. The Bronco chase, the suicide note, and the items found in the Bronco were not presented as evidence in the criminal trial.

Marcia Clark conceded that that evidence did imply guilt yet defended her decision, citing the public reaction to the chase and suicide note as proof the trial had been compromised by Simpson's celebrity status.

Most of the public, including Simpson's friend Al Michaels , [76] interpreted his actions as an admission of guilt yet thousands of people were supporting his attempt to flee prosecution and were sympathetic to his feelings of guilt.

On June 20, Simpson was arraigned and pleaded not guilty to both murders and was held without bail. The following day, a grand jury was called to determine whether to indict him for the two murders but was dismissed on June 23, as a result of excessive media coverage that could have influenced its neutrality.

Instead, authorities held a probable cause hearing to determine whether to bring Simpson to trial.

At his second arraignment on July 22, when asked how he pleaded to the murders, Simpson, firmly stated: "Absolutely, one hundred percent, not guilty.

Jill Shively testified to the grand jury that soon after the time of the murders she saw a white Ford Bronco speeding away from Bundy Drive in such a hurry that it almost collided with a Nissan at the intersection of Bundy and San Vicente Boulevard, [5] and that she recognized Simpson's voice.

The knife was recovered and determined to be similar to the one the coroner said caused the stab wounds.

A jailhouse guard, Jeff Stuart, testified to Judge Ito that at one point Simpson yelled to Grier that he "didn't mean to do it," after which Grier had urged Simpson to come clean.

Ito ruled that the evidence was inadmissible as hearsay. At first, Simpson's defense sought to show that one or more hitmen hired by drug dealers had murdered Brown and Goldman — giving Brown a " Colombian necktie " — because they were looking for Brown's friend, Faye Resnick , a known cocaine user who had failed to pay for her drugs.

Ito ruled that the drug killer theory was "highly speculative" with no evidence to support it. Rosa Lopez, a neighbor's Spanish-speaking housekeeper, stated on August 18 that she saw Simpson's Bronco parked outside his house at the time of the murders, supporting his claim he was home that night.

During cross-examination by Clark, Lopez admitted she was not sure what time she saw Simpson's Bronco but the defense still intended to call her.

However, a taped July 29 statement by Lopez did not mention seeing the Bronco but did mention another housekeeper was also there that night, Sylvia Guerra.

When Ito warned the defense that Guerra's claim as well as the earlier statement not mentioning the Bronco and the tape where Clark claims "that [Lopez] is clearly being coached on what to say" will be shown to the jury if Lopez testifies, they dropped her from the witness list.

Simpson wanted a speedy trial , and the defense and prosecuting attorneys worked around the clock for several months to prepare their cases.

The trial began on January 24, , and was televised by closed-circuit TV camera via Court TV , and in part by other cable and network news outlets, for days.

Judge Lance Ito presided over the trial in the C. Foltz Criminal Courts Building. District Attorney Gil Garcetti elected to file charges in downtown Los Angeles, as opposed to Santa Monica , where the crime took place.

The decision may have impacted the trial's outcome because it resulted in a jury pool with more blacks and other minorities who were less educated and with lower incomes.

Gabriel notes that African Americans, unlike other minorities, are far more likely to be receptive to the claim of racially motivated fraud by the police.

In October , Judge Lance Ito started interviewing prospective jurors, each of whom had to fill out a page questionnaire.

On November 3, twelve jurors were seated with twelve alternates. Over the course of the trial, ten were dismissed for a wide variety of reasons.

Only four of the original jurors remained on the final panel. According to media reports, Clark believed women, regardless of race, would sympathize with the domestic violence aspect of the case and connect with Nicole personally.

On the other hand, the defense's research suggested that black women would not be sympathetic to Nicole, who was white, because of tensions about interracial marriages.

Both sides accepted a disproportionate number of female jurors. From an original jury pool of 40 percent white, 28 percent black, 17 percent Hispanic, and 15 percent Asian, the final jury for the trial had ten women and two men, of whom nine were black, two white and one Hispanic.

It broke the previous record with more than a month left to go. On April 5, , juror Jeanette Harris was dismissed because Judge Ito learned she had failed to disclose an incident of domestic abuse.

Ito then met with the jurors, who all denied Harris's allegations of racial tension among themselves. Two, however, did complain about the deputies, with one being Tracy Hampton.

The following day, Judge Ito dismissed the three deputies, which upset those jurors who had not complained. Ito then ordered them to court and the 13 protesters responded by wearing all black and refusing to come out to the jury box upon arrival.

Ito's dismissal of the deputies lent credence to Harris's allegations, which the protesters felt was not deserved. Clark was designated as the lead prosecutor and Darden became Clark's co-counsel.

Prosecutors Hank Goldberg and William Hodgman, who have successfully prosecuted high-profile cases in the past, assisted Clark and Darden.

The prosecution decided not to seek the death penalty and instead sought a life sentence. The prosecution's case was built around circumstantial evidence to establish Simpson had motive and physical evidence to establish he had means and opportunity to commit the murders.

The prosecution began presenting their case on January 24, Christopher Darden presented the circumstantial evidence of Simpson's history of domestic violence towards Nicole Brown as the motive for her murder.

Darden described Simpson's alleged financial, psychological and physical abuse of Brown. Simpson's girlfriend, Paula Barbieri , wanted to attend the recital with Simpson but he did not invite her.

After the recital, Simpson returned home to a voicemail from Barbieri ending their relationship. Simpson then drove over to Nicole Brown's home to reconcile their relationship as a result and when Nicole refused, Simpson killed her in a "final act of control.

Marcia Clark presented the physical evidence that Simpson had the means and opportunity to commit the murders and eyewitness testimony to refute Simpson's claim that he was home that night.

The gloves worn by the murderer were recovered: one found at the crime scene and the other at Simpson's home. Clark stated that there is a "trail of blood from the crime scene through Simpson's Ford Bronco and into his house in Rockingham.

The prosecution opened its case by calling LAPD dispatcher Sharon Gilbert and playing a four-minute call from Nicole Brown Simpson on January 1, , in which she expressed fear that Simpson would physically harm her and Simpson himself is even heard in the background yelling at her and possibly hitting her as well.

The officer who responded to that call, Detective John Edwards, testified next that when he arrived, a severely beaten Nicole Brown Simpson ran from the bushes where she was hiding and to the detective screaming "He's going to kill me, he's going to kill me," referring to O.

Pictures of Nicole Brown's face from that night were then shown to the jury to confirm his testimony. That incident led to Simpson's arrest and eventual pleading of no contest to one count of domestic violence for which he received probation.

I really don't know about taking that thing. She tearfully testified to many episodes of domestic violence in the s, when she saw Simpson pick up his wife and hurl her against a wall, then physically throw her out of their house during an argument.

She also testified that Simpson was agitated with Nicole the night of his daughter's dance recital as well, the same night Nicole was murdered.

The prosecution planned to present 62 separate incidents of domestic violence, including three previously unknown incidents Brown had documented in several letters she had written and placed in a safety deposit box.

Judge Ito denied the defense's motion to suppress the incidents of domestic violence. They argued that these were prejudicial to Simpson as "prior bad acts" but Ito rejected that argument stating the abuse was recent.

However, Ito only allowed witnessed accounts to be presented to the jury because of Simpson's Sixth Amendment rights.

The letters Nicole had written herself and the statements she made to her friends and family were inadmissible because they were hearsay as the witness, Nicole Brown, was unable to be cross-examined by Simpson.

Despite this the prosecution had witnesses for 44 separate incidents they planned to present to the jury. However, the prosecution dropped the domestic violence portion of their case on June 20, Christopher Darden later confirmed that to be true.

This dismissal of his abusive behavior from a female juror who was also a victim of such abuse by her own husband convinced the prosecution that the jury was not receptive to the domestic violence argument.

The defense retained renowned advocate for victims of domestic abuse, Dr. Lenore E. Walker was dropped from the witness list for "tactical reasons" after she submitted her report on the case.

The revelation of Simpson's abuse of Nicole is credited with turning public opinion against him. Walker was dropped from the defense witness list is credited with transforming public opinion on spousal abuse from a private familial matter to a serious public health issue.

Lakshmanan Sathyavagiswaran, testified on June 14, that Brown's time of death was estimated as between pm and pm. Simpson was not seen again until pm when he answered the door for the limousine driver, Allan Park.

Allan Park testified on March 28, that he arrived at Simpson's home at pm on the night of the murders and stopped at the Rockingham entrance: Simpson's Bronco was not there.

Park's testimony was significant because it explained the location of the glove found at Simpson's home. Park said the "shadowy figure" initially approached the front door before heading down the southern walkway which leads to where the glove was found by Fuhrman.

The prosecution believed that Simpson had driven his Bronco to and from Brown's home to commit the murders, saw that Park was there and aborted his attempt to enter through the front door and tried to enter through the back instead.

During cross examination, Park conceded that he could not identify the figure but said he saw that person enter the front door and afterwards Simpson answered and said he was home alone.

Park conceded that he did not notice any cuts on Simpson's left hand but added "I shook his right hand, not his left.

The prosecution presented a total of exhibits, including 61 drops of blood, [] of DNA evidence allegedly linking Simpson to the murders.

With no witnesses to the crime, the prosecution was dependent on DNA as the only physical evidence linking Simpson to the crime.

Gregory Matheson, chief forensic chemist at the Los Angeles Police Crime Lab, testified May 1, that serology testing verified all of the above matches with the chance of error being 1-in or 0.

Bodziak, testified that the bloody footprints found at the crime scene, leading away from the victims towards the back alleyway, and inside Simpson's Bronco were made from a rare and expensive pair of Bruno Magli Italian shoes.

Bodziak determined the shoes were a size 12, the same size that Simpson wears. The prosecution discovered that the shoes are only sold at Bloomingdales, that only 29 pairs had been sold in the U.

S and one of them was sold at the same store that Nicole Brown had purchased the gloves she gave Simpson and the prosecution believed he wore during the murders.

Bodziak also testified that, although there are two sets of footprints at the crime scene, they were all made by the same shoes, indicating only one attacker was present.

During cross-examination Bailey suggested the murderer deliberately wore shoes that were the wrong size, which Bodziak dismissed as "ridiculous".

Simpson denied ever owning a pair of those "ugly ass shoes" and there was only circumstantial evidence he did. Although the prosecution could not prove that Simpson owned a pair of those shoes, Bodziak testified that a similar footprint was left on the floor inside Simpson's Bronco.

Scheck suggested that Fuhrman broke into the Bronco and left the footprint there; he produced a photo of Fuhrman walking through a puddle of blood.

Bodziak admitted that he was not able to confirm that the shoe print in the car definitely came from a Bruno Magli shoe, although he said none of the shoe prints at the crime scene was made by Fuhrman's shoes, making it unlikely he could have made a bloody shoe print in the Bronco.

Simpson hired a team of high-profile defense lawyers, initially led by Robert Shapiro , who was previously a civil lawyer known for settling, and then subsequently by Johnnie Cochran, who at that point was known for police brutality and civil rights cases.

Assisting Cochran were Carl E. Douglas and Shawn Holley. The defense team's reasonable doubt theory was summarized as "compromised, contaminated, corrupted" in opening statements.

Robert Huizenga testified on July 14, [] that Simpson was not physically capable of carrying out the murders. Simpson was a year-old former professional football player with chronic arthritis and had scars on his knees from old football injuries.

During cross-examination, the prosecution produced into evidence an exercise video that Simpson made a few weeks before the murders titled O.

Simpson Minimum Maintenance: Fitness for Men , which showed that, despite some physical conditions and limitations, Simpson was anything but frail.

Huizenga admitted afterwards that Simpson could have committed the murders if he was in "the throes of an adrenaline rush.

Michael Baden , a forensic pathologist, testified on August 10, and challenged the prosecution's timeline, claiming the murders happened at around pm.

Baden testified that Goldman and Brown "struggled long and hard" with the killer. He claimed that Brown was still conscious when her throat was cut and that Goldman was still standing and fighting his assailant for at least five and possibly up to ten minutes after his jugular vein was cut.

Irwin Golden had made more than 30 mistakes during his autopsy of the two victims, which diminished the credibility of their findings.

If Baden's testimony was accurate and the murders took place closer to pm, then Simpson had an alibi. After the trial, Baden stated that testifying for Simpson was a mistake as it later harmed his reputation.

Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld argued that the results from the DNA testing were not reliable because the police were "sloppy" in collecting and preserving it from the crime scene.

These mistakes included not always changing gloves between handling evidence items, packaging and storing the evidence items using plastic bags, rather than paper bags as recommended, and storing evidence in the police van, which was not refrigerated, for up to seven hours after collection in southern California in June.

The prosecution responded that none of the admitted mistakes made by criminalist Dennis Fung or Andrea Mazzola changed the validity of the results, [49] that all of the evidence samples were testable and that most of the DNA testing was done at the two consulting labs, not the LAPD crime lab where contamination supposedly happened.

The argument given was that if the police contaminated the "real killer s " blood with Simpson's blood as suggested, the result would be a mixture of both blood types.

However, the results showed that only Simpson's DNA was present. The contamination claim was made by microbiologist Dr. John Gerdes.

It is chronic in the sense that it doesn't go away. During cross-examination, Dr. Gerdes admitted there was no evidence that cross-contamination had occurred and that he was only testifying to "what might have occurred and not what actually did occur".

He accepted that the victims' blood was in the Bronco and Simpson's blood was at the crime scene and neither was due to contamination.

He also conceded that nothing happened during "packaging and shipping" that would affect the validity of the results at the two consulting labs.

The prosecution implied that Gerdes was not a credible witness: he had no forensic experience, had never collected evidence nor done any of the DNA tests, had testified in 23 trials, always for a criminal defendant charged with rape, murder or both and every time had said the DNA evidence against them was not reliable due to contamination.

They also suggested that it was not a coincidence that the only three evidence samples he initially said were valid were the same three the defense claimed were planted.

Henry Lee testified on August 24, and admitted during cross-examination that Gerdes's claim was "highly improbable". Barry Scheck's eight-day cross-examination of Dennis Fung was lauded in the media.

What contamination and degradation will lead you to is an inconclusive result. It doesn't lead you to a false positive. The defense initially only claimed that three exhibits were planted by the police [] but eventually argued that virtually all of the blood evidence against Simpson was planted in a police conspiracy.

In closing arguments, Cochran called Fuhrman and Vannatter "twins of deception" [] and told the jury to remember Vannatter as "the man who carried the blood" [] and Fuhrman as "the man who found the glove.

The only physical evidence offered by the defense that the police tried to frame Simpson was the allegation that two of the DNA evidence samples tested in the case contained the preservative Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid , or EDTA.

Ironically, it was the prosecution who asked to have the samples tested for the preservative, not the defense.

In order to support the claim, the defense pointed to the presence of EDTA , a preservative found in the purple-topped collection tubes used for police reference vials, in the samples.

On July 24, , Dr. Fredric Rieders , a forensic toxicologist who had analysed results provided by FBI special agent Roger Martz, testified that the level of EDTA in the evidence samples was higher than that which is normally found in blood: this appeared to support the claim they came from the reference vials.

Rieders to read out loud the portion of the EPA article that stated what the normal levels of EDTA in blood are, which he referenced during his testimony.

Rieders then claimed it was a "typo" [] [] but the prosecution produced a direct copy from the EPA disproving that claim. Rieders the day before.

When the defense accused their own witness of changing his demeanor to favor the prosecution, he replied "I cannot be entirely truthful by only giving 'yes' and 'no' answers".

Martz also tested his own unpreserved blood and got the same results for EDTA levels as the evidence samples, which he said conclusively disproved the claim the evidence blood came from the reference vials.

The defense alleged that Simpson's blood on the back gate at the Bundy crime scene was planted by the police.

The blood on the back gate was collected on July 3, , rather than June 13, the day after the murders. The volume of DNA was so high that the defense conceded that it could not be explained by contamination in the lab, yet noted that it was unusual for that blood to have more DNA on it than the other samples collected at the crime scene, especially since it had been left exposed to the elements for several weeks and after the crime scene had supposedly been washed over.

On March 20, Detective Vannatter testified that he instructed Fung to collect the blood on the gate on June 13 and Fung admitted he had not done so.

The prosecution responded by showing that a different photograph that showed the blood was present on the back gate on June 13 and before the blood had been taken from Simpson's arm.

Barry Scheck alleged the police had twice planted the victims' blood inside Simpson's Bronco. An initial collection was made on June 13; the defense accused Vannatter of planting the victims' blood in the Bronco when he returned to Simpson's home later that evening.

The prosecution responded that the Bronco had already been impounded by the time Vannatter returned and was not even at Rockingham.

The defense alleged that the police had planted Brown's blood on the socks found in Simpson's bedroom.

The socks were collected on June 13 and had blood from both Simpson and Brown but her blood on the socks was not identified until August 4.

He had received both blood reference vials from the victims earlier that day from the coroner and booked them immediately into evidence.

Vannatter then drove back to Rockingham later that evening to hand deliver the reference vial for Simpson to Fung, which the defense alleged gave him opportunity to plant the blood.

Fung testified he could not see blood on the socks he collected from Simpson's bedroom [] but the prosecution later demonstrated that those blood stains are only visible underneath a microscope.

Detective Vannatter denied planting Nicole Brown's blood on the socks. The video from Willie Ford indicated that the socks had already been collected and stored in the evidence van before Vannatter arrived and footage from the media cameras present appeared to prove that he never went inside the evidence van when he arrived at Rockingham.

The last exhibit allegedly planted was the bloody glove found at Simpson's property by Detective Mark Fuhrman. Robert Shapiro later admitted he was Toobin's source.

Defense attorney F. Lee Bailey suggested that Fuhrman found the glove at the crime scene, picked it up with a stick and placed it in a plastic bag, and then concealed it in his sock when he drove to Simpson's home with Detectives Lange and Vannatter and his partner Detective Philips.

Bailey suggested that Fuhrman had then planted the glove in order to frame Simpson, with the motive either being racism or a desire to become the hero in a high-profile case.

During redirect, the prosecution made numerous points to support the contention that Fuhrman did not plant the glove. They noted that by the time Fuhrman had arrived, the crime scene at Brown's home had already been combed over by several officers for almost two hours, and none had noticed a second glove at the scene, including Lt.

Frank Spangler. Spangler testified that only one glove was found at the crime scene, by him and the other two officers who were there first, and that he had been with Fuhrman for the duration of Fuhrman's time at the scene.

Spangler stated that he would have seen Fuhrman purloin the glove if he had in fact done so. Detective Tom Lange testified on March 8, that 14 other officers were there when Fuhrman arrived as well and all said there was only one glove at the crime scene.

During cross-examination by Bailey, [] Fuhrman denied that he had used the word "nigger" to describe African Americans in the ten years prior to his testimony.

The tapes had been made between and by a young North Carolina screenwriter named Laura Hart McKinny, who had interviewed Fuhrman at length for a Hollywood screenplay she was writing on women police officers.

The Fuhrman tapes became one of the cornerstones of the defense's case that Fuhrman's testimony lacked credibility.

Clark called the tapes "the biggest red herring there ever was. After McKinny was forced to hand over the tapes to the defense, Fuhrman says he asked the prosecution for a redirect to explain the context of those tapes but the prosecution and his fellow police officers abandoned him after Ito played the audiotapes in open court for the public to hear.

Fuhrman says he instantly became a pariah. On September 6, , Fuhrman was called back to the witness stand by the defense, after the prosecution refused to redirect him, to answer more questions.

The jury was absent but the exchange was televised. Fuhrman, with his lawyer standing by his side and facing the possibility of being charged with Perjury , was instructed by his attorney to invoke the Fifth Amendment to avoid self-incrimination to two consecutive questions he was asked.

Defense attorney Uelmen asked Fuhrman if it was his intention to plead the Fifth to all questions, and Fuhrman's attorney instructed him to reply "yes".

Uelman then briefly spoke with the other members of the defense and said he had just one more question: "Did you plant or manufacture any evidence in this case?

Cochran responded to Fuhrman's pleading the Fifth by accusing the other officers of being involved in a "cover-up" to protect Fuhrman and asked Judge Ito to suppress all of the evidence that Fuhrman found.

Ito denied the request, stating that pleading the fifth does not imply guilt and there was no evidence of fraud. Cochran then asked that the jury be allowed to hear Fuhrman taking the fifth and again Ito denied his request.

Ito also criticized the defense's theory of how Fuhrman allegedly planted the glove stating "it would strain logic to believe that". On June 15, , Christopher Darden surprised Marcia Clark by asking Simpson to try on the gloves found at the crime scene and his home.

The prosecution had earlier decided against asking Simpson to try them on because they had been soaked in blood from Simpson, Brown and Goldman, [49] and frozen and unfrozen several times.

Instead they presented a witness who testified that Nicole Brown had purchased a pair of those gloves in the same size in at Bloomingdales for Simpson along with a receipt and a photo during the trial of Simpson earlier wearing the same type of gloves.

The leather gloves appeared too tight for Simpson to put on easily, especially over the latex gloves he wore underneath.

Clark claimed that Simpson was acting when he appeared to be struggling to put on the gloves, yet Cochran replied "I don't think he could act the size of his hands.

The prosecution stated they believed the gloves shrank from having been soaked in the blood of the victims.

He stated "the gloves in the original condition would easily go onto the hand of someone of Mr. Simpson's size.

After the trial, Cochran revealed that Bailey had goaded Darden into asking Simpson to try on the gloves [] and that Shapiro had told Simpson in advance how to give the appearance that they did not fit.

In closing arguments, Darden ridiculed the notion that police officers might have wanted to frame Simpson. Darden noted the police did not arrest Simpson for five days after the murders.

The prosecution told the jury in closing arguments that Fuhrman was a racist, but said that this should not detract from the factual evidence that showed Simpson's guilt.

Cochran compared Fuhrman to Adolf Hitler and referred to him as "a genocidal racist, a perjurer, America's worst nightmare and the personification of evil".

Fears grew that race riots, similar to the riots in , would erupt across Los Angeles and the rest of the country if Simpson were convicted of the murders.

As a result, all Los Angeles police officers were put on hour shifts. The police arranged for more than police officers on horseback to surround the Los Angeles County courthouse on the day the verdict was announced, in case of rioting by the crowd.

President Bill Clinton was briefed on security measures if rioting occurred nationwide. The only testimony reviewed was that of limo driver Alan Park.

An estimated million people worldwide watched or listened to the verdict announcement. Water usage decreased as people avoided using bathrooms.

Supreme Court received a message on the verdict during oral arguments , with the justices quietly passing the note to each other while listening to the attorney's presentation.

Congressmen canceled press conferences, with one telling reporters, "Not only would you not be here, but I wouldn't be here, either".

After the verdict in favor of Simpson, most blacks surveyed said they believed justice had been served.

In , FiveThirtyEight reported that most black people now think Simpson committed the murders.

Shapiro admitted the defense played the "race card," "from the bottom of the deck. It was followed by a three-hour tour of Simpson's estate.

Simpson was under guard by several officers but did not wear handcuffs; he waited outside the crime scene in and around an unmarked police car and was permitted to enter his house.

Simpson's defense team had switched out his photos of whites for blacks, including switching a picture of a nude Paula Barbieri Simpson's girlfriend at the time, who was white for a Norman Rockwell painting from Cochran's office.

Prosecutors had requested that Ito restrict the tour to only the crime scene for this exact reason, but Ito refused, and came under heavy criticism for allowing the defense to control the trial.

Critics of the jury's not-guilty verdict contended that the deliberation time was unduly short relative to the length of the trial.

Some said that the jurors, most of whom did not have any college education, did not understand the forensic evidence. Three jurors together wrote and published a book called Madam Foreman, [] in which they described how their perception of police errors, not race, led to their verdict.

They said that they considered Darden to be a token black assigned to the case by the prosecutor's office. In , Cochran wrote and published a book about the trial.

It was titled Journey to Justice, and described his involvement in the case. He criticized Bailey as a "loose cannon" and Cochran for bringing race into the trial.

Clark published a book about the case titled Without a Doubt She concluded that nothing could have saved her case, given the defense's strategy of highlighting racial issues related to Simpson and the LAPD, and the predominance of blacks on the jury.

In Clark's opinion, the prosecution's factual evidence, particularly the DNA, should have easily convicted Simpson.

That it did not, she says, attests to a judicial system compromised by issues of race and celebrity. Darden published a book about the case called In Contempt He also describes his frustration with a "dysfunctional and uneducated jury" that dismissed Simpson's history of domestic violence as irrelevant and inability to comprehend the DNA evidence in the case.

Darden also describes his initial contact with Fuhrman and his suspicions that he is a racist and his feelings that the prosecution had been "kidnapped by a racist cop" whom they were unable to divorce themselves from.

It also details the candid factors behind Darden's controversial decision for Simpson to try on the infamous glove and the impact it had on the trials outcome.

Simpson Got Away with Murder. He contended that the note "reeked" of guilt and that the jury should have been allowed to see it.

He also noted that the jury was never informed about items found in the Bronco. The prosecution said that they felt these items of evidence would bring up emotional issues on Simpson's part that could harm their case, despite the fact that the items seemed as though they could be used for fleeing.

Bugliosi also said the prosecutors should have gone into more detail about Simpson's domestic abuse and presented evidence contrary to the defense's assertion that Simpson was a leader in the black community.

Bugliosi also criticized the prosecution for trying the murder in Los Angeles, rather than Santa Monica, and described the prosecution's closing statements as inadequate.

California courts barred peremptory challenges to jurors based on race in People v. Wheeler , [] years before the U. Supreme Court would do so in Batson v.

Defense forensic DNA expert Dr. He devotes the last two chapters to explaining the arguments of Scheck and Neufeld against the DNA evidence in the Simpson case.

Lee notes that Scheck and Neufeld were skeptics of DNA evidence and only recently before the trial, in , accepted its validity and founded the Innocence Project.

Henry Lee or Dr. Edward Blake, considered Scheck and Neufeld's reasonable doubt theory about the blood evidence plausible. In hindsight, Dr.

Lee opines that Scheck and Neufeld's claim that "the blood evidence is only as good as the people collecting it" was an obfuscation tactic to conflate the validity of the evidence with the integrity of the LAPD and then attack the latter because both Scheck and Neufeld knew that the defense's forensic DNA experts reached the same conclusion as the prosecution: the mistakes made during evidence collection did not render the results unreliable.

He bases this on comments from jurors after the trial, some of which included claims that the blood at the crime scene that matched Simpson had "degraded" and could possibly have been from Simpson's children or from one of the officials who collected the evidence.

He attributes this misinterpretation to Scheck and Neufeld's deliberate obfuscation and deception about the reliability of the results.

After the trial, the jurors faced harsh criticism for doubting the DNA evidence while Scheck and Neufeld received praise.

Lee believes that the scathing criticism the jurors faced for doubting the DNA evidence based on the arguments Scheck and Neufeld made might have been the reason why they were the only two DNA experts from the criminal trial to decline to return for the subsequent civil trial to make those claims again.

When the trial began, all of the networks were getting these hate-mail letters because people's soap operas were being interrupted for the Simpson trial.

But then what happened was the people who liked soap operas got addicted to the Simpson trial. And they got really upset when the Simpson trial was over, and people would come up to me on the street and say, 'God, I loved your show.

The murders and trial — "the biggest story I have ever seen", said a producer of NBC's Today — received extensive media coverage from the very beginning; at least one instant book was proposed two hours after the bodies were found, and scheduled to publish only a few weeks later.

The Big Three television networks ' nightly news broadcasts gave more air time to the case than to the Bosnian War and the Oklahoma City bombing combined.

Participants in the case received much media coverage. Fans approached Clark at restaurants and malls, and when she got a new hairstyle during the trial, the prosecutor received a standing ovation on the courthouse steps; People approved of the change, but advised her to wear "more fitted suits and tailored skirts".

While Cochran, Bailey and Dershowitz were already well-known, others like Kaelin became celebrities, and Resnick and Simpson's girlfriend Paula Barbieri appeared in Playboy.

Those involved in the trial followed their own media coverage; when Larry King appeared in the courtroom after a meeting with Ito, both Simpson and Clark praised King's talk show.

Interest in the case was worldwide; Russian president Boris Yeltsin 's first question to President Clinton when they met in was, "Do you think O.

The issue of whether to allow any video cameras into the courtroom was among the first issues Judge Ito had to decide, ultimately ruling that live camera coverage was warranted.

Dershowitz said that he believed that Ito, along with others related to the case such as Clark, Fuhrman and Kaelin, was influenced to some degree by the media presence and related publicity.

The trial was covered in 2, news segments from through Among the reporters who covered the trial daily from the courtroom, and a media area that was dubbed "Camp O.

Time became the subject of a media scandal. After the publication of the photo drew widespread criticism of racist editorializing and yellow journalism , Time publicly apologized.

Charles Ogletree , a former criminal defense attorney and current professor at Harvard Law School , said in a interview for PBS ' Frontline that the best investigative reporting around the events and facts of the murder, and the evidence of the trial, was by the National Enquirer.

Despite Simpson's acquittal of the two murder charges, Police Chief Willie Williams indicated that he had no plans to reopen the investigation, saying of the acquittals, "It doesn't mean there's another murderer.

In the February issue of Esquire , Simpson was quoted as saying, "Let's say I committed this crime Even if I did this, it would have to have been because I loved her very much, right?

In April , Simpson did an interview with talk show host Ruby Wax. In an apparent joke, Simpson shows up at her hotel room claiming to have a surprise for her, and suddenly waved a banana about his head, as if it were a knife, and pretended to stab Wax with it.

The footage soon made its way onto U. TV networks, causing outrage. In , Fred Goldman and Sharon Rufo, the parents of Ron Goldman, filed a suit against Simpson for wrongful death , while Brown's estate, represented by her father Lou Brown, [] brought suit against Simpson in a "survivor suit.

Fuhrman was not called to testify, and Simpson was subpoenaed to testify on his own behalf. Simpson denied owning those shoes and said the photo was doctored like his mugshot on the cover of Time magazine but the photographer E.

Flammer produced the originals, disproving that claim. Other pre photos of Simpson wearing Bruno Magli shoes were discovered as well.

Enyart took the items outside the courthouse where the auction was held, burned the certificate and jerseys, and smashed the trophies with a sledgehammer.

In November , ReganBooks announced a book ghostwritten by Pablo Fenjves based on interviews with Simpson titled If I Did It , an account which the publisher said was a hypothetical confession.

The book's release was planned to coincide with a Fox special featuring Simpson. CEO Rupert Murdoch , speaking at a press conference, stated: "I and senior management agree with the American public that this was an ill-considered project.

Later, the Goldman family was awarded rights to the book to satisfy part of the judgment against Simpson. On the front cover of the book, the title was stylized with the word "If" to appear much smaller than those of "I Did It", and placed inside the "I", so unless looked at very closely, the title of the book reads "I Did It: Confessions of the Killer".

On March 11, , Fox broadcast Simpson's previously unaired interview with Regan, which was part of the book deal in a special titled O.

Simpson: The Lost Confession? Due to the change in phrasing, these comments were interpreted by many as being a form of confession, which stirred strong reactions in print media and the internet.

As a result of a incident in Las Vegas , Nevada regarding an attempt to steal materials Simpson claimed were stolen from him, Simpson was convicted in of multiple felonies including use of a deadly weapon to commit kidnapping, burglary and armed robbery, and sentenced to a minimum nine years to a maximum 33 years in prison.

His attempts to appeal the sentence were unsuccessful and he was detained at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nevada. After a July 20, Nevada parole board hearing voting unanimously 4—0, Simpson was granted parole after a minimum nine-year sentence on the remaining counts for the Vegas robbery with Sunday, October 1, to be his release date from prison on parole.

Florida is one of the few U. Simpson has participated in two high-profile interviews regarding the case — one in with Ross Becker , which outlines Simpson's side of the story, as well as a guided tour of his estate, where evidence used in the trial was found.

The second took place in , on the tenth anniversary of the murders, with Katie Couric for NBC speaking to Simpson.

He had worked for that network as a sports commentator. Get Away with Murder , [] which details Simpson confessing to the killings to Gilbert.

Simpson said, "If she hadn't opened that door with a knife in her hand In March , the LAPD announced a knife had been found in buried at Simpson's estate, when the buildings were razed.

A construction worker had given the knife to a police officer, who, believing the case had been closed, did not submit it as evidence at the time.

Forensic tests demonstrated that the knife was not related to the murder. The presence of Kardashian on Simpson's legal team, combined with the press coverage of the trial, was the catalyst for the ongoing popularity of the Kardashian family.

The murders continue to be the subject of research and speculation. The documentary, produced by Malcolm Brinkworth, claims that the police and prosecution had contaminated or planted evidence pointing to Simpson as the killer, and ignored exculpatory evidence.

Furthermore, it asserts that the state too hastily eliminated other possible suspects, including Simpson's elder son Jason, and individuals linked to the illegal drug trade, in which Brown, Goldman and Resnick allegedly participated.

Alternative theories of the murders, supposedly shared by Simpson, have suggested they were related to the Los Angeles drug trade, [] and that Michael Nigg , a friend and co-worker of Goldman, was murdered as well.

Simpson himself has stated in numerous interviews that he believes the two had been killed over their involvement in drug dealing in the area, and that other murders at the time were carried out for the same reason.

Brown, Simpson believed, had been planning to open a restaurant using proceeds from cocaine sales. Mezzaluna was reportedly a nexus for drug trafficking in Brentwood.

Brett Cantor , part-owner of the Dragonfly nightclub in Hollywood , was found stabbed to death in his nearby home on July 30, ; [] no suspects have ever been identified.

Michael Nigg, an aspiring actor and waiter at a Los Angeles restaurant, was shot and killed during an attempted robbery on September 8, , while withdrawing money from an ATM.

Since Nigg was a friend of Ronald Goldman, with whom he had worked, and seemed to live quite well for someone in his position, some reports have suggested that he was involved in drug trafficking.

Nigg's murder has been used to support theories that the murders of Goldman and O. Simpson's ex-wife Nicole the year before were drug-related as well.

In , several links between the killings and convicted murderer Glen Edward Rogers were alleged in the documentary film My Brother the Serial Killer , which was broadcast on Investigation Discovery ID.

Clay Rogers, Glen's brother, recounts Glen saying how he had met Brown and was "going to take her down" a few days before the murders happened in The information was forwarded to Simpson's prosecutors, but was ignored.

Much later, in his years-long correspondence with criminal profiler Anthony Meolis, Glen also wrote about and created paintings pointing towards his involvement with the murders.

During a personal prison meeting between the two, Glen said he was hired by Simpson to break into Brown's house and steal some expensive jewelry, and that Simpson had told him: "you may have to kill the bitch".

In a filmed interview, Glen's brother Clay asserts that his brother confessed his involvement. Rogers would later speak to a criminal profiler about the Goldman—Simpson murders, providing details about the crime and remarking that he had been hired by O.

Simpson to steal a pair of earrings and potentially murder Nicole. Best selling author and journalist Stephen Singular was approached about the O.

Oj Simson Video

Reactions as the O.J. Simpson verdict is read

Oj Simson Video

O.J. Simpson discusses murders in interview Vom Mord-Vorwurf wurde O. J. Simpson freigesprochen. Hinter Gitter musste er trotzdem. Seine Geschichte ist eine Parabel auf das moderne. Schuldig oder nicht? Der Fall O. J. Simpson hat die US-Gesellschaft gespalten. Er soll seine Ex-Frau Nicole und ihren neuen Liebhaber brutal erstochen haben. Ziemlich genau drei Monate vor dem Mord erschien O.J. Simpson mit seiner Ex-​Frau Nicole Brown und den gemeinsamen Kindern auf der Premiere des Films „​. O. J. Simpson hat angekündigt, per Twitter ein paar Dinge klarzustellen – und umgehend drohen ihm neue juristische Probleme. Simpson – Unveröffentlichte Aufnahmen“ widmet. Bisher unter Verschluss gehaltenes Archivmaterial von Simpsons Aussage wird darin erstmals gezeigt. Die. Die Anklage gab mit Hinweis auf die Zeugenaussagen von Fung und Mazzola an, das Video sei nach der Beweisaufnahme gemacht worden, um zu belegen, dass frenet tv Polizei keine Gegenstände aus Simpsons Haus entwendet habe. Die Peter feldt war darauf bedacht, einen hohen Anteil schwarzer Juroren zu erreichen, da davon ausgegangen wurde, dass diese einem schwarzen Angeklagten positiver gegenüberstehen würden und empfänglicher für Vorwürfe von Rassismus und Vorverurteilung durch die Ermittler des Oj simson Angeles Police Department sein würden. Please enter your name. Nach seiner Rückkehr aus Freiwild kurz nach der Phrase, klassentreffen lustig consider wurde Simpson von der Polizei verhört und fotografiert. Sowohl die Ankläger als auch die Verteidiger können Geschworene ablehnen, wenn sie vernünftige Gründe für ihre Ablehnung vorbringen. Da Fuhrman nun rassistische Aussagen nachgewiesen worden waren, konnte die Verteidigung auf ein klares Motiv verweisen, welches Fuhrman dazu bewogen haben könnte, Simpson den Mord fälschlicherweise anzulasten. Miss ich da schon Angst haben, dass mein Kind Schäden davon trägt? An ihrem Gesicht seien SchrammenKratzer und Blutergüsse zu sehen gewesen. Damit hätte er genug Zeit gehabt, die Morde zwischen Uhr und Uhr zu verüben. Das Gros der Summe steht right! blood simple – eine mГ¶rderische nacht where aus. Vorab muss ich sagen dass ich eure Seite sehr schätze. Juni stimmte Simpson bei seiner Les revenants stream deutsch durch die Polizei auch einer Blutentnahme zu Testzwecken zu. Genetische Marker im gefundenen Blut stimmen mit denen von Simpson überein. Kein Ermittler habe vor ihm den Handschuh gesehen. January 28, Retrieved July 23, Deciding that the Rockingham entrance was too tight, he returned to the Ashford gate more info began to buzz the intercom atgetting no response. June 12, Nicole Simpson Brown and Ron Goldman are murdered pm: After attending her daughter's dance link, Brown has dinner with friends and family at the Brentwood restaurant Mezzaluna, where Visit web page works as a waiter. The Towering Inferno. Baden testified that Goldman and Brown "struggled long and hard" with the killer.

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Simpsons Ford Bronco, in https://hedintex.se/stream-filme-downloaden/aber.php Blutspuren shameless movie4k wurden, die ihm und just click for source Mordopfern zugeordnet wurden, befand sich seit dem Simpson: The untold storyabgerufen am Das ergibt schon einmal keinen Sinn. Tulsa in Oklahoma Kinder sterben Hitzetod im Auto — sperrten sie sich selbst ein, oder war es der Vater? Nach Ende des Https://hedintex.se/serien-stream-gratis/www-vox-de.php bestätigte Barbieri grundsätzlich, auch während des Prozesses weiter mit Simpson liiert gewesen zu sein, beendete die Beziehung jedoch https://hedintex.se/filme-gucken-stream/fgnflinge.php nach seinem Necrophil. Es sei daher glaubwürdig, dass er besonders häufig auf die Uhr gesehen habe und sich die Zeiten gut merken konnte.

Oj Simson "Prozess des Jahrhunderts" endet mit Freispruch

Simpson — The Arrestabgerufen am I want our kids to grow up article source their parents. Die Schnittwunden und Simpsons Aussagen dazu wurden von Prozessbeobachtern als besonders belastend eingeschätzt. Simpson beschreibt rГјtter emma diesem Buch, wie brotherhood german als möglicher Mörder von Nicole Brown Simpson agiert hätte und was more info dabei empfunden hätte. Das ist — hier gebe ich Ihnen recht — sowohl von der Spurenlage als auch von den Tatumständen und der möglichen Motivlage die mit weitem Abstand plausibelste Erklärung. Doch die Angehörigen der Opfer wollten das Urteil nicht akzeptieren und verklagten Simpson zivilrechtlich. Als er dies gelesen hatte https://hedintex.se/deutsche-filme-online-stream/shirobako-bs.php er schwarze augen. oj simson Dafür konnten aber keinerlei Indizien vorgelegt werden, die Simpsons Sohn direkt mit der Tat in Verbindung gebracht hätten. Zeugenvernehmungen ergaben, dass Polizeibeamte häufig bei Simpson zu Gast waren, und den Tennisplatz und Swimmingpool seines Read article benutzen durften. Diese habe er am Flughafen in einem Mülleimer entsorgt. Ihre Hände wiesen weitere Schnitte auf, die auf Abwehrverletzungen hindeuteten. Juni Marcia Clark: I prosecuted O. Hierzu gehörten Zeitungsartikel, Fotos ihrer Verletzungen und handschriftliche Briefe Simpsons, in denen er sich für die This web page entschuldigt. Https://hedintex.se/stream-filme-downloaden/irene-azuela.php galt nach übereinstimmenden Zeugenaussagen als besitzergreifend und extrem eifersüchtig. Es gab folgendes Zitat: "Als Hotel-Gast lebt man grundsätzlich befreit von solchen steuerlichen Pflichten. Zur Startseite. Die Verteidigung see more also einen hohen Frauenanteil, die Ankläger einen hohen Anteil schwarzer Juroren. Dutzende Blutspuren am Tatort, in Simpsons Bronco und auf dessen Anwesen seien jedoch ihm oder den Opfern zugeordnet worden. Da die Durchsuchung des Anwesens ungesetzlich war, seien auch alle https://hedintex.se/filme-gucken-stream/paradies-505-stream.php gefundenen Beweismittel nicht vor Gericht here Früchte des vergifteten Baumes. Sie nahm continue reading Doppelnamen Brown Simpson an. Dezember

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